Cinema Raw Equipment

Getting camera and audio gear can be the most exciting part of purchasing a new camera. The potential stories are nearly limitless. Professional filmmakers with high-end budgets seem to have access to any camera and gear they need. Many professionals in the filmmaking world rent their gear. But for independent filmmakers and production houses shooting on low budgets, as well as multimedia journalists and students on an even tighter budget, getting the right gear is essential.

I will only list gear that I feel is needed for basic shooting setups. I will not tell you which camera to get. Each one has its merits, quirks and challenges to use. In most situations, professionals will tell you that they will rent the right camera for the particular job they’re doing. One camera does not fit every bill. With that said, I’ll make the following recommendations as a ball park for those needing guidance.

  • Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera For journalists and advanced casual shooters. Shoot in ProRes mode for run and gun situations. If you’re a journalist or documentary filmmaker and you have this camera on you, you can get some things as they arise—especially if you’re wanting to shoot low profile. This is a great portable camera, allowing you to shoot broadcast quality images on the run.
  • Blackmagic Cinema Camera For many who were used to shooting with DSLRs, this camera was a shock when they saw the sharpness of the uncompressed image. It’s a solid camera for production houses doing promotional and commercial videos. For just about $2000, this seems to be the best deal—if you can overcome its quirks, but realize you will need to pay thousands more to get this up to a field- or studio-ready camera. It has the capability to shoot CinemaDNG raw, as well as Apple ProRes (422), and DNxHD format (for Avid). This flexibility makes this a fairly versatile camera, and with a 2.5K sensor you can do some crop work in post for full HD composition.However, you will need to buy the right camera for the mount you want (EF or micro 4/3). It provides a sharp look and some filmmakers are shooting some nice-looking commercial and promotional videos with this camera. It has its own character and the image coming out of the camera does not look like the other cameras profiled in this book. For documentary and/or news work, use the ProRes format to save space and postproduction time. After shooting with this camera, I have no problem using it for certain documentary work, as well.It wants to be placed on a tripod with an EVF, especially when shooting outdoors day. I was able to place this on a monopod and shoot handheld in some situations.
  • Digital Bolex D16 For independent filmmakers, those shooting fiction and independent feature narratives, this is hands down one of the best digital cinema cameras on the market today—and for the price point it’s unparalleled. Some filmmakers state that for all of the digital cinema cameras out there, this is the real deal. If you’re pixel counting and making an argument for 4K, you’re in the wrong game. This camera, like others in its class, is about harnessing color depth, filmic texture, and nice skin tones.Filmmaking isn’t about ultra high resolution. For those who want to shoot documentaries, it’s possible with this camera, as long as you’re investing enough cards and hard drive space. This camera will feel like you’re shooting with a film camera. I feel, image-wise, this is the best camera covered in this book for shooting narrative and documentary work.1 Ergonomically, it’s certainly easier to shoot with than the BMCC, but not quite as cool looking as the Ikonoskop.
  •  Ikonoskop ACam dII For independent filmmakers. This is the first and the most ergonomically pleasing. It shoots beautiful images and as one filmmaker states, it makes you feel like you’re shooting poetry when using it. However, due to the high price point you’re better off getting the Digital Bolex D16, since it expresses a similar feel in its final image.

All of the cameras profiled in this book are not out-of-the-box consumer video cameras or DSLRs. They’re cinema cameras and every one of them represents the base price to get the body. You can’t do cinema without other gear, so you must factor that into your budget.

D16 Digital Bolex Kit: ~$5000

The first affordable raw cinema camera announced, the D16 Digital Bolex is beautiful and boasts an ergonomic design—through quite not as sexy as the Ikonoksop A-Cam dII, it expresses a lot of thought and it is the only raw cinema camera on the market that welcomed input from its potential users throughout the entire design process. It is also self-contained–you don’t need to build on it (other than lenses) to make it acceptable (due to its two 24-bit XLR audio connectors).

D16 Digital Bolex: ~$3600 (body)

Figure-3.21-D16-Digital-Bolex

If you’re looking for a digital camera with character, this is it. The look is as strong or stronger than the Ikonoskop and at one-third of the price, you cannot beat this deal. Some filmmakers shooting with the beta test camera say that the D16 is the real deal capturing the essence of what it is like to shoot on 16mm film in a digital format. It provides nice skin tones and ability to shape a film stock look in post. For independent narrative films, this may be just the camera to get. It is the digital replacement of Bolex’s 16mm film camera and expresses a 16mm film texture.

I’ve shot two short documentaries and a professionally paid gig for a promo with this camera (all with on-camera attached Sennheiser microphone for audio) and have no hesitation in using this as an A-cam for production house projects, documentaries, or fiction. I’ve shot two short documentaries handheld and the promo with a monopod.

The screen is two small to really use outside the menu controls (you can certainly eyeball your shot with it, but for detailed composition work, I recommend the SmallHD DP4). I also recommend getting the 500GB SSD drive model for $3600.

Resolution

  • 2048 x 1152 (Super 16mm mode)
  • 1920 x 1080 (16mm mode)
  • 1280 x 720 (720p)
  • 720 x 480 (480p)

Format: Adobe CinemaDNG
Colour depth: 12 bit 4:4:4
File size: 2 to 3 MB per frame in RAW
Sensor: Kodak 1” CCD: 12.85 mm (H) x 9.64 mm (V)
Pixel Size: 5.5 micron
Framerate: up to 32 fps at 2K, 60fps at 720p, 90 fps at 480p
Sound: Balanced, 2 channel 24 bit, 96 kHz via XLR
Viewfinder: 320×240, 2.4” diagonal
Video out: 1920 x 1080 HDMI via HDMI port
640 x 480 via 1/8” video jack
Ports: HDMI, Audio XLR (2), 1/8” video, headphone, USB 3.0,
4-PIN XLR (INPUT)4-PIN XLR (OUTPUT)

More info at: http://digitalbolex.com

Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 4.13.38 PM

For more info: http://www.digitalbolex.com/kish-at-nab/

This set of C-mount fixed aperture lenses is between $300-350 each. In addition, you can get a different mount plate for the camera. It not only includes the C-mount, but you can also get an EF, PL, M43, and eventually a C-mount turret. The EF mount will also allow you to attach Canon lenses if you have a collection from your DSLR set. I shot with Zeiss Contax lenses using a C-mount to EF adapter during the beta test phase of the camera with good results (using the photodiox Zeiss to EF adapter ring attached to the lenses).

Noktor SLR Magic  Hyper-Prime Cine 12mm T/1.6: ~$600

slr1216mft

 

The Noktor is designed as a cinema lens and it’s fast for low light situations, which is needed for these smaller sensor cameras. This is a micro four-thirds mount, so you’ll need to get the right adapter for the camera. It’s also a wide lens, which for the 16mm world will give you a normal field of view, because of the nearly three times crop factor of a full frame sensor camera, like the 5D (so this will give you close to a 36mm version).

For more info: http://www.adorama.com/SLR1216MFT.html

 

For those doing journalism or documentary work, you should consider getting the Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 lens, for about $1200—it’ll give you a 36-105mm range equivalency.

Also, take a look at Rokinon cinema lenses (good price). I’ve shot with the 8mm, 16mm, and 24mm with the Bolex (with a Canon to C mount adapter) and received solid results.

Rokinon_16T22

Rokinon_16T22

 

 

 

 

 

 

16mm T 2.2: ~$500:  http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/999944-REG/rokinon_cv16m_c_16mm_t2_2_cine_lens.html

24mm T1.5: ~$750: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/890625-REG/Rokinon_cv24m_c_24mm_T1_5_CINE_ED.html

 

Audio
The D16 comes with two professional XLR inputs with 24-bit audio. It’s one of the best audio features of any camera I’ve used. (Most cameras use only 16-bit audio.) It also includes a minijack input if you want to mount a Rode VideoMic Pro to it. It also features a minijack headphone output.I use a Sennheiser shotgun and dialogue microphone.There are audio meters on the camera and pots to adjust them, but the current firmware build responds with a delay on the meters as you adjust the levels, so that’s a feature that needs to get fixed.  You can get a Sennheiser power module and choose different types of microphones to hook up to it (such as a shotgun, cardiod, or omni mic capsules); see: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/870380-REG/Sennheiser_504287_K6_Microphone_System_Powering.html

SmallHD DP4 EVF: ~$600

Figure-3.23-SmallHD-EVF

The built in screen is one of the weakest elements of the camera — it’s fine for using for menus, but difficult to see when shooting (especially if you’re not cradling the camera or doing low angle work).

The SmallHD puts out a beautiful image and the monitor can be mounted to the side of the camera with the additional cold shoe mount (I use the top one for my mic). See: http://smallhd.com/

Alternatively, for more money you can get purchase a small 3″ monitor, the Kinotehnik LCDVFe Electronic Viewfinder. It’s a lighter monitor and allows for angle adjustments without unscrewing mount nuts. I like it better than the SmallHD.

Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 6.46.07 PM

CF card: ~$600-1200 (optional)
The D16 comes with two CF card slots, but you don’t need to use them. The internal SSD drive will give you about two hours of footage (500GB drive) in HD mode or about 90 minutes in 2K mode. It’ll take over an hour to offload the drive using the USB 3 cable. The cards are useful if you want to buffer footage from the SSD to the CF cards as you shoot and then hand them off to a camera assistant to dump. Then you won’t have the down time offloading the full drive at once.

Switronix external battery pack: ~$330Figure-3.14-Switronix-PowerBase-70

The D16 comes with an external battery, which will give you a couple of hours of shooting time (I was able to shoot off and on all day, recording close to two hours of footage with the internal battery).

If you’re planning to do an intensive shoot, all day, then it’s recommended that you get the Switronix external battery for $325.The tripod mount is plastic and it doesn’t fit snuggly to the bottom of the D16, so I used self-adhesive sticky pads from Home Depot to help it mount better.

See: http://www.digitalbolex.com/shop/switronix-battery-pack-bundle/

 

BLACKMAGIC POCKET CINEMA CAMERA KIT~$2300

Although not a fully uncompressed CinemaDNG camera, it’s modeled to have a “lossless” (compressed) DNG format, as well as Apple ProRes (HQ) settings. I include it, since it is in many ways the successor to the Blackmagic Cinema Camera (2.5K model), and could in some ways replace it due to the fact that many people will likely gravitate towards the 4K BMCC.

For this price point, you’re getting the camera body and a basic go-to lens, as well as two high-end 64GB memory cards (records 50 minutes of video in ProRes recording mode), as well as three batteries, a battery charger, and a monopod— for stable static and moving shots. This is probably a great run and gun setup for video journalists, documentary filmmakers, and indie shooters on a tight budget. As you get additional gear, you will likely want to invest in better lenses. Just getting two good micro 4/3 lenses could cost up to an additional $2500!

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera: ~$1000

Figure-3.1-BMPC

Why get this camera?

This camera is for those who want portability above anything else. The BMCC is a better camera in that it shoots at 2.5k and uncompressed raw, while the “lossless” CinemaDNG raw format is compressed 2.5 times, but it remains to be scene as of this writing how it compares to uncompressed raw.However, with that said, if you can get the look of your scenes in camera, then the 10-bit Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) is a solid format and good enough for broadcast. If you’re wanting to shoot cinema, then use this as a backup camera and use the Iknoskop, BMCC, or Digital Bolex.

This camera is actually perfect for those doing video journalism in the field, foreign correspondence, and documentary work where portability and the ability to keep a low profile, and move quickly is essential (although you’ll need external audio, because the built in audio is quite awful). It also has potential for film students who want to engage in a 16mm film look for their projects. Certainly for the price, you cannot go wrong.

CheesyCam.com offers some words of advice, however. Be sure to get the Extreme SDHC card (SDXC). (See the one from SanDisk, below.). According to CheesyCam, you cannot format the card in-camera. It must be done with your computer. Format to HFS+ or exFat. Have plenty of batteries on hand. They tend to drain fast. Unless there is a fix, there are no audio meters on-camera. Use the external audio recorder for your primary audio and be sure to check levels. (See http://cheesycam.com/blackmagic-design-pocket-cinema-camera-a-few-tips/.)

For more info: http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/blackmagicpocketcinemacamera/

Noktor SLR Magic  Hyper-Prime Cine 12mm T/1.6: $500

slr1216mft

It’s ironic you can purchase a cinema camera for around a $1000, but the lenses cost so much more. But it must be remembered that the camera body is what gets replaced—the lenses (or glass) are what will last a long time and are irreplaceable.Out of all the lenses listed here, this may be the best go-to lens for interviews and portrait work, as well as capturing action (it’s equivalent to a 35mm lens on a full frame sensor camera).

The Noktor is also designed as a cinema lens. For those doing journalism or documentary work, you should consider getting the Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 lens, for about $1200—it’ll give you a 36-105mm range equivalency. And if you’re on a really tight budget, the Panasonic lens (14mm f/2.5) pictured above on the BMPC and costs $325.

Zoom H1 kit and cold shoe mount adapter: ~$185+30

Figure-3.3-Zoom-H1-kit Figure-3.4-Pearstone-shoe-adapter

More info at: http://www.zoom.co.jp/products/h1/

B&H kit info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/731488-REG/Zoom_H1_H1_On_Camera_DSLR_Audio.html

Pearstone shoe adapter: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/616254-REG/Pearstone_9041680_Accessory_Shoe_Adapter_w.html

You can certainly purchase a Zoom H4 or Tascam DR-40, but if you’re looking for the tightest budget and something small and light you can mount on the camera, this will do the trick.This microphone provides excellent dialogue quality. It allows a fairly tight focus, so you capture mostly the sound you’re pointing at, with some side ambiance. Excellent shotgun microphone.For price and utility, this setup is a decent audio recorder for a camera. It as the advantage of not only being up to record audio to the Zoom H1, but it has the added benefit of being able to input a cable from the Zoom H1 to the Blackmagic camera. This also provides the advantage of listening to the microphone from the input of the camera.

The cold shoe mount attaches to the top of the camera, allowing you to add the mount that’s included in the kit. The included windscreen is essential when shooting outdoors. If you need a shotgun mic, then use the Sennheiser MKE400 (profiled below in the audio section) for $200. The advantage to Zoom H1 setup is that you have secondary audio being recorded onto the recorder and into the camera. But if you already have your own audio recorder, use the Sennheiser for good reference audio and audio backup.

SanDisk Extreme Pro

Figure-3.5-Sandisk-64gb

Memory is getting cheap, but for those of use shooting raw video (or near raw), then getting a reliable card is important. This SanDisk SDXC card has a write speed of up to 90 MB/s and is one of the fastest cards in this class. SanDisk makes a slower SDXC card (60 MB/s write speed) for around $85, but you will want the fastest one you can get for raw.

But remember, you’re not shooting on a compressed file DSLR — the 64GB card will give you about 8-12 minutes of recording time in raw (which on a DSLR, you would get about two hours!).

More info at: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/824149-REG/SanDisk_SDSDXPA_064G_A75_Extreme_Pro_64GB_SDHC_SDXC.html

Nikon EN-EL20 battery: ~$15 (battery) + $35 (Nikon charger)

 BMPC_batteryFigure-3.7-Nikon-battery-charger

For those of use who’ve shot on Canon DSLRs and collected batteries, the Nikon will be a disappointed. But at least you can take the battery out of the camera, unlike the BMCC. Each battery will give you about one hour of shooting, so have plenty on hand if you’re doing a long shoot.

It doesn’t look like the camera comes with an external charger (but you charge in camera), so getting an external recorder is essential.

Benro monopod with S2 head: ~$140

Figure-3.8-Benro-monopod

I have not used this monopod, but it’s half the price of the Manfrotto—which I use a lot for video shooting. I feel that due to the small profile of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, that this one will work well for most shooting situations, providing the functionality of stability, while allowing not only for pans and tilts, but push in and pull out shots by leaning the monopod in and pulling back and vice versa. Use the handle to keep the shot level. Includes a level bubble. The feet provide stability and there’s the ability to lock and adjust the pan, tilt, and drag elements on them.

For more info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/967697-REG/benro_a38fbs2_a38f_classic_aluminum_monopod_s2.html

Stillmotion’s monopod tutorial and 3 Over 1 Rule is essential viewing for monopod shooting:

 

Blackmagic Cinema Camera kit: ~$6000

This is where the price point goes up. You can just get the camera—but you still need lenses, external batteries, SSD for raw recording and storage, audio, a tripod or monopod. It adds up. But the Blackmagic Cinema Camera was the first base-priced inexpensive raw camera to hit the market. Despite some of its quirks, such as the attempt to be a large DSLR in its ergonomic design, it shoots a beautiful image (although there are still issues with moire and rolling shutter).

Blackmagic Cinema Camera (Micro 4/3 lens mount): ~$2000

  • Full HD video (1920×1080 at 23.98p, 24p, 25p, 29.97p, 30p)
  • Sensor: 16.64×14.04mm (actual) 15.6×8.8mm (active)
  • Resolution: 2.5k 2432×1366 cmos
  • Recording formats: CinemaDNG 12-bit raw, Apple ProRes 422 (HQ), Avid DNxHD (1920×1080)
  • Audio: ¼” TRS inputs
  • Thunderbolt interface

More info at: http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/blackmagiccinemacamera/

Why get this camera?

This camera is for those who want affordable CinemaDNG raw—and want the option to shoot Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) or Avid DNxHD.The 2.5k sensor actually gives you a nicer looking HD image. Furthermore, there’s also professional HDSDI and Thunderbolt outputs (but no XLR audio connectors). It also comes with a full version of DaVince Resolve, one of the industry standards for color grading.With the ability to shoot uncompressed raw for under $2,000, this camera stands up to high end professional cinema cameras costing thousands more. There are two versions of the BMCC—one with a micro 4/3 mount and one with the Canon EF mount. Both mounts are passive—meaning you cannot control automatic features of lenses. But these cameras contain a 2.5k sensor, meaning you can crop in on an image without losing resolution in a 2k/HD workflow.

Furthermore, for those who want to shoot in the world of 4k, they offer an S35 sensor model at 4k resolution for $3,000. Philip Bloom writes, “One of the biggest issues for me by far was the choice of lens mount. I love Canon glass and have a lot of it, but they are designed for way bigger sensors than the small BMD sensor. This resulted in a large 2.3x crop of the image, but worse than that, the only light hitting the BMD sensor was from the centre part of the glass, not the whole thing, meaning the image was compromised straight off because of that.” (Bloom, Philip. 29 March 2013. “Review of the Blackmagic Micro Four Thirds Cinema Camera.” http://philipbloom.net/2013/03/29/bmdmft/)

But beware — the audio is poor, with no meters and barely good enough to use as reference audio. A DSLR with Magic Lantern produces useable sound — the Blackmagic cameras do not deliver usable sound. Also, no global shutter.

Additional gear

Noktor SLR Magic  Hyper-Prime Cine 12mm T/1.6: ~$500

slr1216mft

It’s ironic you can purchase a cinema camera for around a $1000, but the lenses cost so much more. But it must be remembered that the camera body is what gets replaced—the lenses (or glass) are what will last a long time and are irreplaceable.

Out of all the lenses listed here, this may be the best go-to lens for interviews and portrait work, as well as capturing action (it’s equivalent to a 35mm lens on a full frame sensor camera). The Noktor is also designed as a cinema lens. For those doing journalism or documentary work, you should consider getting the Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 lens, for about $1200—it’ll give you a 36-105mm range equivalency. And if you’re on a really tight budget, the Panasonic lens (14mm f/2.5) pictured above on the BMPC and costs $325.

Zoom H1 kit and cold shoe mount adapter

Figure-3.3-Zoom-H1-kit Figure-3.4-Pearstone-shoe-adapter

More info at: http://www.zoom.co.jp/products/h1/

B&H kit info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/731488-REG/Zoom_H1_H1_On_Camera_DSLR_Audio.html

Pearstone shoe adapter: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/616254-REG/Pearstone_9041680_Accessory_Shoe_Adapter_w.html

You can certainly purchase a Zoom H4 or Tascam DR-40, but if you’re looking for the tightest budget and something small and light you can mount on the camera, this will do the trick.

This microphone provides excellent dialogue quality. It allows a fairly tight focus, so you capture mostly the sound you’re pointing at, with some side ambiance. Excellent shotgun microphone.

For price and utility, this setup is a decent audio recorder for a camera. It as the advantage of not only being up to record audio to the Zoom H1, but it has the added benefit of being able to input a cable from the Zoom H1 to the Blackmagic camera. This also provides the advantage of listening to the microphone from the input of the camera. The cold shoe mount attaches to the top of the camera, allowing you to add the mount that’s included in the kit.

The included windscreen is essential when shooting outdoors. If you need a shotgun mic, then use the Sennheiser MKE400 (profiled below in the audio section) for $200. The advantage to Zoom H1 setup is that you have secondary audio being recorded onto the recorder and into the camera. But if you already have your own audio recorder, use the Sennheiser for good reference audio and audio backup.

SanDisk Extreme II SSD 480GB: ~$300

Figure-3.13-Sandisk-SSD

This SanDisk drive will record 90 minutes of raw footage. You’ll want to probably invest in two-four of these for a day-long shoot. If you’re doing documentary work and need more storage, you may want to consider shooti
ng in Apple ProRes mode, unless you have the budget to get more. However, this is not an enterprise-level SSD (found in a Digital Bolex), and you may find that you’ll need to replace it sooner than you’d like. Just place that in your budget.

For more info: http://www.sandisk.com/products/ssd/sata/extreme-ii/

B&H site: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1000581-REG/sandisk_sdssdxp_480g_g25_extreme_ii_480gb_ssd.html

Switronix external battery: ~$300

Figure-3.14-Switronix-PowerBase-70

The Blackmagic Cinema Camera comes with an external battery, but it’ll only last about an hour (perhaps 90 minutes). So if you’re planning to do an intensive shoot, all day, then it’s recommended that you get the Switronix external battery, which will give you an additional six to eight hours of life.

For more info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/884706-REG/Switronix_pb70_bmcc_Powerbase_70_Battery_Pack_for.html

Ikan D5 SDI Camera Monitor, sunhood, and articulating arm (6″): ~$770

Ikan_monitor

For the kit of this kit with monitor, Sony battery, charger, sunhood, adapter, you’ll be spending close to $800.

For more info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/895165-REG/ikan_D5_DK_S_5_6_3G_SDI_LCD.html

Because the BMCC has no HDMI out, you must purchase an SDI capable monitor and other accessories. You will only need this if you’re shooting daylight outside (or inside under really bright conditions) in order to overcome the glare that’ll hit the rear screen of the BMCC. There’s really no other way around it that I’m aware of.

The LCD screen on the BMCC is fine indoors, especially in dark conditions—but forget it when you’re shooting outdoor day. Even the supplied hood on the camera is quite useless in daylight.

This Ikan is a solid monitor. Be sure to add the sunhood, otherwise there’s really no point in getting the monitor. You’ll also need a way to mount the monitor onto the BMCC. Use the Redrock Micro ultraPlate that attaches to the top of the BMCC, where you’ll be able to use 1/4” screw holes to mount the articulating arm, as well as a Zoom H1 audio kit.

Redrock Micro ultraCage for BMCC: ~$500-655

Figure-3.19-Blackmagic-BMCC-cage

For more info: http://www.redrockmicro.com/Blackmagic-Cinema-Camera/ultraCageblackmagic.html

For those shooting with accessories—external audio, microphones, external LCD screen, and so on—this gear may be one of the best investments for the ergonomically challenged BMCC. Include the top plate and a handle and you’ll be able to shoot some low-angle handheld shots. The base attaches to a tripod or monopod. But you could just purchase the ultraPlate for $45 and add some accessories to it and save the $500 to put towards a lens.

For a top-plate and handle, you can get both for $155.

Manfrotto Fluid Monopod with 500 Series Head: ~$330

Manfrotto_500_monopod

The Manfrotto monopod—which I use a lot for video shooting—is probably the best stabilization gear you will ever buy. I used it for some of the shots for Carpetbag Brigade with the Blackmagic Cinema Camera (https://vimeo.com/65856805) profiled in Chapter 5.

For more info: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/945109-REG/manfrotto_mvm500a_pro_fluid_monopod_with.html

Stillmotion’s monopod tutorial and 3 Over 1 Rule is essential viewing for monopod shooting:

https://vimeo.com/26869155 and

http://stillmotionblog.com/h234hs23dkw21/ (first video)

More info at: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/945109-REG/manfrotto_mvm500a_pro_fluid_monopod_with.html

Ikonoskop A-Cam dII Kit ~$12,000

The first 16mm raw cinema camera and probably the best designed, Ikonoskop’s A-Cam dII expresses a sense of character to the image. The kti below does not include lenses or audio, but a variety of mounts can be purchased to utilize everything from PL cinema lenes to Canon DSLR lenses. This may be a camera best rented for your particular production needs (which can range from $300-500 per day). If you’re using it professionally for a paid job, then you would include the price of the rental into your costs.

Ikonoskop A-Cam dII: ~$9000

Figure-3.24-Ikonoskop-ACam-dII

Full HD video (1920×1080 at 23.98p, 24p, 25p, 29.97p, 30p)

Sensor: CCD
Resolution: 2.5k
Recording formats: CinemaDNG 12-bit raw
More info at: http://www.ikonoskop.com/

Why get this camera?

Note: This camera halted production in the summer of 2013. By the time this book is printed it may be back into production, but if not, the camera would be still available at some rental houses.   This camera was the first CinemaDNG 12-bit raw camera and in some ways it’s considered the best. All of the cameras features in this book have an option of hooking up PL mounts, so you can use high end cinema lenses. It’s probably the sleekest design of all the 16mm cinemaDNG raw cameras on the market and it not only conveys character in the design, but it expresses a look unlike any other digital cinema camera on the market.

For more info: http://www.rawcinemashop.com/

 

Additional audio gear

Sennheiser Evolution G3 wireless lav: ~$630

Figure-3.43-Sennheiser-lav

These are the mid-level standard for wireless lav. These are a must for documentary work. Not only do they good for interview work, but they’re great for cinema verite work, recording the subject as they move around and do their work.

More info at: http://en-us.sennheiser.com/wireless-clip-on-lavalier-microphone-set-presentation-ew-100-eng-g3

If you want portability, this light microphone from Sennheiser just might to the trick. This might be the perfect reference mic for the BMPC (be sure to get the Pearstone shoe adapter and windmuff (MZW400) for wind protection.

The microphone is all metal, so it is rugged and the AAA battery will last up to three hundred hours. It has a frequency response of 40Hz to 20kHz and uses a 1/8-inch TRS miniplug (which will fit into Blackmagic’s Pocket Cinema Camera and DSLRs with no adapters).

You may try and run and gun with this microphone, but you’ll be limited to the quality of the recording device—in this case the camera. It is recommended that you record audio separately, such as with a Tascam or Zoom recorder and use this for reference and back-up audio. The Zoom H1 with the B&H kit profiled above, may be the better choice, since it’s a small recorder and microphone package together.

 

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